Prof Sheena Cruickshank

Sheena Cruickshank – Research summary

Sheena Cruickshank

Sheena Cruickshank

The principal theme of our group’s work is in understanding how immune responses are started in response to infection or injury. We use a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches to characterise the mechanisms of crosstalk between immune cells, commensal bacteria, pathogens and epithelial cells. We use wounding models or infectious models including Toxoplasma gondii and Trichuris muris to answer fundamental questions about the regulation of immunity in the skin and gut.

We have been characterising the way that the skin and gut recognises and responds to the microbiome and how the microbiome affects cell function. Our group has demonstrated that epithelial mediated signals promote dendritic cell (DC) mobilisation to the epithelial lining of the gut in response to infection or injury. Furthermore, DC recruitment to the gut epithelium, is strongly associated with resistance to infection by many pathogens. We have found epithelial pathways that are rapidly switched on in resistance to infection. Our work on “resistance pathways” is now being used to define and develop biomarkers that can be used to help manage gut inflammation in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Related projects are focused on defining the role of macrophages and eosinophils in inflammation and in vascular adipose tissue function.

As well as fundamental lab research we are doing a lot of outreach work working with communities based in the Uk and abroad to discuss the impact of parasite infection. We are also investigating why allergies are increasing in the UK via the citizen science project Britain breathing (www.britainbreathing.org) alongside colleagues across the University faculties, the RSB and BSI.

Email: sheena.cruickshank@manchester.ac.uk | Tel: 0161 275 1582 | Twitter: @sheencr

People

Sheena Cruickshank – People

Muna Alhubail
Rachel Crompton
Jamie Farrington
Sheila Maccharia
James O’Sullivan~
Jordie Roberts
Gurdeep Singh

People

Sheena Cruickshank – People

Muna Alhubail
Rachel Crompton
Jamie Farrington
Sheila Maccharia
James O’Sullivan~
Jordie Roberts
Gurdeep Singh

Collaborators

James Brewer, University of Glasgow, UK
William Agace, University of Lund
Sarah Withers, University of Salford
Ian Wilson, Imperial College

Outreach

Sheena Cruickshank – Outreach

I enjoy communicating my research to the public and believe it is a vital part of a scientist’s role in society. I co-developed The Worm Wagon with Joanne Pennock and Kathryn Else to share our research with the public. I now focus on two inter-linked projects which have evolved from this, enabling access to science around the theme of infection for non-native English speakers and working with communities to understand allergies and the impacts of pollution (#BritainBreathing).

I was awarded RSB Communicator of the Year in 2013 and was a finalist in the NCCPE Engage (2014) and BBSRC Innovator (2016) competitions. I have discussed infection and my research in the media. In 2017, I was awarded an AAAS Leshner Fellowship in Public Engagement. I am also the University’s academic lead for Public Engagement for Research.

Publications

  • Bramhall, Michael MSc; Flórez-Vargas, Oscar MSc; Stevens, Robert PhD; Brass, Andy PhD; Cruickshank, Sheena PhD. Quality of Methods Reporting in Animal Models of Colitis. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. June 2015. Vol. 21 - Issue 6: p 1248–1259
  • Mohammedsaeed W, McBain AJ, Cruickshank SM and O’Neill, CA. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Inhibits the Toxic Effects of Staphylococcus aureus on Epidermal Keratinocytes. Applied and Environmental Microbiology published online ahead of print on 11 July 2014 Appl. Environ. Microbiol. doi:10.1128/AEM.00861-14.
  • Flórez-Vargas O, Bramhall M, Noyes H, Cruickshank S, Stevens R and Brass A. The Quality of Methods Reporting in Parasitology Experiments. PLOSOne 9(7): e101131. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0101131
  • Bowcutt R, Bramhall M, Logunova L. Wilson J, Booth C, Carding SR, Grencis RK, Cruickshank SM. A role for the pattern recognition receptor Nod2 in mediating recruitment of CD103+ dendritic cells to the colon in response to infection. J Mucosal Immunol.
  • Bailey CR, Hautefort I, Dalton JE, Overweg K, Egan CE, Bongaerts RG, Newton DJ, Siggins M, Cruickshank SM, Andrew EM and Carding SR. Intraepithelial lymphocytes modulate intestinal levels of antimicrobial Angiogenin 4 In response to Salmonella infection PLOS one 2013 8 (12): 1-16 (e84553).
  • Campbell L, Saville C, Kitagawa Y, Murray PJ, Cruickshank SM, M Hardman† (joint last author). Dermal arginase 1 impairs cutaneous healing with an altered inflammatory response. J Invest Dermatology 2013 133: 2461–2470.
  • Campbell L, Williams H, Crompton R, Cruickshank SM*, M Hardman* (*joint last author). Nod2 deficiency impairs inflammatory and epithelial aspects of the cutaneous wound healing response. J Pathol 2013 229: 121-131.
  • Bowcutt R, Bell L, Little M, Wilson J, Booth C, Murray P, Else K, Cruickshank SM. Arginase-1 Expressing macrophages are dispensable for resistance to infection with the gastrointestinal helminth Trichuris muris, Parasite Immunology 2011 33: 411-420.
  • Cruickshank SM, Deschoolmeester ML, Svensson M, Howell G, Bazakou A, Logunova L, Little MC, English N, Mack M, Grencis RK, Else KJ, Carding SR. (2009). Rapid dendritic cell mobilization to the large intestinal epithelium is associated with resistance to Trichuris muris infection. Journal of Immunology, 182(5), 3055-62.